Troubleshooting Common Laminating Problems

Whether you’re new to laminating or have been using a laminator for years, troubleshooting common lamination problems can seem confusing. Luckily, most issues can be solved relatively easily, as long as you know how to properly recognize the symptoms. Below is a list of some of the most frequently encountered laminating problems, and tips on how to remedy them.

My laminating pouch appears cloudy, even after going through the machine.

All laminating pouches have a slightly cloudy appearance before they are sealed, since the adhesive has not been thermally activated. If you have run the pouch through your pouch laminator and it still has a milky look to it, it is most likely an indication that the laminating temperature is set too low. For laminators that have adjustable temperature settings, simply increase the temperature in small increments until the cloudiness disappears. If you own a machine that does not allow you to adjust the temperature, then you are probably using a pouch that is thicker than recommended by the manufacturer, which is why it is not heating properly. Refer to the owner’s manual for additional information.

The edges of my pouches aren’t sealing, or there are bubbles that don’t adhere in the center.

Like cloudiness, improper sealing is most often a sign of not enough heat. Try slowly increasing the temperature until the pouch achieves a uniform seal. Poor adhesion and delamination can also occur if you are laminating documents that were printed on a laser or inkjet printer. These documents can be particularly difficult to stick to if there is heavy ink coverage and may require the use of a “photo” quality laminator.

My document looks wavy after being laminated.

When a laminating pouch has a rippled appearance after being run through the machine, it probably means that the heat is set too high. If you own a machine with adjustable temperature, back the heat down incrementally until the waviness disappears. If you’re using a machine without that option, then you are most likely using a pouch that is too thin for that machine to laminate properly, or you may be require to use a carrier sheet. Refer to the owner’s manual for additional information.

When I run the pouch through the machine, adhesive squeezes out from the edges.

Oozing adhesive is another sign of excessive heat. To prevent this from happening, reduce the temperature and run a sample pouch. Repeat this process until the adhesive remains within the pouch and still achieves a proper seal. Depending on the specifications of your machine, you may also want to try using a carrier sheet to help prevent any adhesive from sticking to your rollers.

The edges of my pouch come unsealed after I trim away the excess.

We recommend that you leave a 1/8” border around your document in order to maintain a proper seal. Trimming away more than that may result in some or all of the edges becoming exposed to moisture or humidity. When this occurs, the paper absorbs the moisture and causes the lamination adhesive to release, or delaminate.

My rollers have residual adhesive stuck to them.

Lamination Depot offers a Roller Cleaning Kit that contains special cleaner and abrasive pads that will remove adhesive build-up without hardening or damaging your rollers.

My documents laminate perfectly when I run them through my machine without using a carrier sheet, however they don’t seal properly when I try to use one.

Since carrier sheets add a barrier between the heating element and the laminate film, you’ll need to increase the temperature to ensure that the proper amount of heat makes it through the carrier and onto the film. Conversely, if you are accustomed to laminating with a carrier and need to laminate without one for some reason, you’ll want to turn the heat down since the heating elements will be making direct contact with the film instead of passing through a carrier beforehand. See our website for a recommended temperature guide.

An Overview of Comb Binding: Professional, Inexpensive & Easy to Edit

With all of the binding styles available in today’s marketplace, it can sometimes be a challenge to determine which one is right for your needs. From purchasing the appropriate machine to determining what supplies you will need for any given project, it is important to be able to identify the benefits and limitations of each binding style. In this post, we will cover the basics of comb binding, which is a versatile, inexpensive binding style with many uses.

Plastic Binding Combs

The Basics

Comb binding utilizes plastic combs in order to create custom booklets. The punch pattern for comb binding has 19 holes per letter-sized sheet, and can be created using either a manual or electric punch. A comb opener holds the comb open while punched pages are inserted onto the prongs.

Plastic Binding Combs

Plastic binding combs are available in a broad range of sizes, accommodating as few as 12 pages and as many as 425 pages. They come in standard 11″ lengths, which are made up of 19 rings and are sized to bind 8 1/2″ x 11″ (letter size) paper. Comb sizing is based upon the diameter of the comb in inches (or fractions thereof). Binding combs come in a wide variety of colors, allowing organizations to create custom-looking bound documents without having to pay for custom combs. The comb design allows for easy editing of documents, since it can be opened after binding to add, remove or reorder pages without damage. It is the only binding style that offers that capability, making it ideal for organizations that require frequent updates to their materials, such as churches or schools.

For information on which size of comb to use for your project, refer to this comb binding chart. To see the selection of comb sizes and colors offered by Lamination Depot, visit our comb binding supplies section.

Comb Binding Machines

Comb binding is based on two individual processes – punching the documents that are to be bound and openingthe binding comb so that the punched documents can be inserted. Depending on the machine, punching can either be manual or electric, however the comb opener is always operated manually. Nearly all machines perform both processes, but it is important to read the description thoroughly because there are a few machines on the market that only offer comb opening (generally used in high-volume production environments to allow punching and inserting to be done simultaneously by two different people).

When researching comb binding machines, there are a number of factors to consider in terms of punching. The primary difference between available models is whether they are manual or electric, which has a major impact on the speed at which the operator is able to complete a job (with electric punches being much faster). Some punches only punch letter-sized paper, while others can accommodate larger sizes. The punch capacity (the number of sheets that can be punched at one time) ranges from 6-55 sheets, and some machines offer the ability to selectively disengage some or all of the punching pins (which allows the user to punch non-standard paper sizes or specialty paper, such as three-hole paper). Many machines include an adjustable depth margin, enabling the operator to move the placement of the holes relative to the edge of the paper. Select machines include other punching patterns in addition to the 19 hole comb pattern, making them a cost-effective option for organizations interested in performing multiple binding styles (such as coil and wire).

All comb openers generally function the same way – when the operator tugs on the handle, small hooks grab onto each of the rings and gently pull them open to allow the pages to be inserted. Depending on the machine, the opener itself is made from either metal or ABS plastic. Each model has its own maximum binding size, so it is important to evaluate your binding needs before making a purchase to help ensure that the machine you buy accommodates the sizes you will be utilizing.

To learn more about any of the comb binding machines available at Lamination Depot, visit our comb binding equipment section.

In Review

Comb binding is a versatile, professional-looking binding style that offers users the ability to make frequent edits with ease. The plastic combs used to bind the pages together are cost-effective, durable and attractive. With both manual and electric punching options available, it is possible to create your own bound reports and presentations at a price point that fits within nearly all budgets. Because it is the only binding style to give users the power to add, remove or reorder pages without having to use a fresh spine, comb binding is highly recommended for use in any organization that creates bound documents that require regular updates, such as training manuals, price lists, or educational materials. With all of the benefits that it offers, it’s easy to see why comb binding is one of the most popular binding methods.

Finding the Perfect Laminating Pouch Just Got Easier!

If you’ve ever had trouble finding a laminating pouch to fit your documents, then you’ll love the latest feature available at Lamination Depot! Our new laminating pouch size calculator makes it easier than ever to determine which pouch size is the most appropriate for your document.

Finding your pouch is only two steps away:

  • Enter the dimensions of the document that you want to laminate in decimal form
  • Click the “Find My Pouch!” button to discover the best pouch size for your document

Click here to see this feature in action!

Choosing the Right Roll Laminator for your Business

Many types of businesses and organizations can benefit from owning their own roll laminating machine, but with all of the specialty functions and features present on many large-format laminators, determining which machine best fills your specific needs can be a difficult task. In this post, we will discuss the basics of each type of roll laminator to help you make an informed decision on which machine is most appropriate for your organization.

The Basics

Nearly all roll laminators are thermal machines, which means that they utilize heat to seal the edges of the laminate film and fuse the layers together. Depending on the machine, the heat is applied by either heated rollers or heat shoes, which are long, flat, aluminum plates. Regardless of the type of heating element, all machines utilize rollers to help ensure secure adhesion, eliminate air bubbles and move the laminated documents through the machine. While the machine cost is somewhat higher for a roll laminator as compared to a pouch laminator, roll laminating film is far cheaper per square foot than laminating pouches of comparable thickness, so organizations transitioning from laminating with pouches to laminating with roll film will likely notice a significant cost savings on supplies.

All thermal roll laminating machines offer variable temperature control to allow users to adjust the heat level based on the thickness of the laminating film and the document being laminated. Many roll laminators also include a reverse feature, which makes it easier to clear jammed or misfed documents. Other popular features include adjustable speed, adjustable tension, cutting and slitting devices, forced air cooling fans (to help reduce curling of laminated items), and the ability to operate the machine using a footswitch.

When selecting a roll laminator, you’ll need to evaluate the features that are the most important to your specific needs. If you will be producing a high volume of laminated documents, then you may want to look for a machine with a higher maximum laminating speed. If you plan on performing mounting, then you’ll want to look for a machine that allows for mounting (and can accommodate the thickness that you will be most commonly using). Those who only laminate standard-sized documents may be content with a model that has a maximum document width of 13″, while those looking to laminate signs or other larger displays will likely want a machine that offers a greater maximum width. Taking the time to review the specific features of the available roll laminating machines will help to ensure that you get the best laminator for your purposes.

School & Office Laminating Machines

Our selection of school and office laminating machines range in width from 13″-27″, and are generally the most budget-friendly models. Some machines within this category are able to handle laminating film up to 10 mils in thickness, but many models are only able to laminate using 1.5 mil or 3.0 mil film. The maximum speed of the school and office laminators is slower than that of commercial-level machines, but they are still considerably faster than most pouch laminating machines.

Our most popular laminator within the school and office category is the D&K Minikote 27″ School & Office Roll Laminator. This well-liked machine offers the following features:

D&K Minikote 27″ School & Office Roll Laminator

Max. Roll Width: 27″

Mils: 1.5 & 3.0 Mil Film

Speed: 9.5′ per Minute

Silicone Rollers: No

Heating Method: Heat Shoe

Reverse Feature: Yes

Adjustable Tension: Yes

Warranty: One Year Parts Warranty, Six Month Labor Warranty, Three Month Roller Warranty

D&K Minikote 27 in. School & Office Roll Laminator

If you’re looking for a well-made, versatile machine to laminate posters, signage or even gang-runs of smaller items such as index cards or letter-sized paper, the D&K Minikote 27″ School & Office Roll Laminator is a great entry-level machine at a reasonable price. Businesses seeking faster lamination with more advanced features will likely want to explore our collection of wide format laminating machines, discussed in the following section.

Wide Format Laminating Machines

Similar in function to our school and office laminators, our wide format laminating machines feature a wider maximum width, increased speed and a broader range of features for medium-duty users. These mid-level machines have a laminating width ranging between 27″-60″, and are capable of laminating up to 30′ per minute. They also perform mounting of up to 1/2″ thick, and can laminate with film up to 10 mils in thickness.

The ProLam PL-238WF High Performance Wide Format 38″ Laminator is the top-selling model in the wide-format category. Below is a listing of some of the most notable features of the PL-238WF:

ProLam PL-238WF High Performance Wide Format 38″ Laminator

Max. Roll Width: 38″

Mils: Up to 10 Mil Film

Speed: 7′ per Minute

Silicone Rollers: Yes

Heating Method: Heated Rollers

Mounting Thickness: Up to 1/4″

Cooling Fans: Four Fans

Power Requirements: 240 Volt, 20 Hz, 2800 Watts – 30 Amps Dedicated Circuit

Warranty: One Year Parts & Labor

roLam PL-238WF High Performance Wide Format 38 in. Roll Laminator

For businesses seeking a powerful, mid-level machine capable of mounting and laminating with film up to 10 mil thick, the ProLam PL-238WF High Performance Wide Format 38″ Laminator is a robust machine at an attractive price point. Advanced features like the built-in stand and cooling fans allow users to achieve professional-grade results within their own offices. If you’re looking for an even more powerful machine for industrial applications, then you’ll want to read on to learn about our collection of commercial laminators.

Commercial Laminating Machines

High-volume users that require the utmost in speed and quality need to look no further than our selection of commercial laminating machines. These machines give users the ability to mount up to 1/2″ thick and laminate up to 10 mils, at speeds up to 65′ per minute. Since this collection of machines is specifically geared toward the commercial market, they also offer a number of more advanced features, such as single-sided laminating, high-speed automatic cutting and feeding, and footage counters.

In the commercial laminators category, the Ledco HD25 Workhorse 25″ roll laminator is amongst the most popular models. Below is an overview of some of the many features the HD25 offers:

Ledco HD25 Workhorse 25″ Laminator

Max. Roll Width: 25″

Mils: Up to 10 Mil Film

Speed: Up to 25′ per Minute (Variable Speed)

Silicone Rollers: Yes

Heating Method: Removable Teflon-Coated Heat Shoes

Mounting Thickness: Up to 1/2″

Forced Air Cooling Fans: Yes

Heat Control: Intelligent heat controllers learn to anticipate the heat demand of each job

Built-In Retractable Slitters: Yes

Feed Tray: Yes

Power Requirements: 220v, 20A

Warranty: Two Years Parts & Labor

LEDCO HD25 Workhorse Roll Laminator

The Ledco HD25 Workhorse 25″ roll laminator has a robust selection of features at a price that makes it an attractive option to almost any commercial user. It also has a number of optional features that can be added at the time of purchase to make it even more productive, such as pressure sensitive take-up rollers, a scrap rewinder and a utility stand. If you are part of a print shop, in-plant graphics department or other high-volume production environment looking to purchase a roll laminator, be sure to take a look at the HD25, as well as our other reliable commercial laminators.

In Review

From standard-sized sheets to oversized posters and signage, roll laminators provide an excellent solution to nearly all laminating needs. They give businesses the ability to create durable and attractive signs, menus and other promotional materials on-site, and with a lower supply cost than that of pouch laminators. Because roll laminators are available at a wide range of price points and offer a plethora of advanced features, it is worth investing a little extra time and effort to learn about the strengths and weaknesses of the various models that you are interested in before making a purchase.

Twin Loop Wire vs. Spiral-O: Which is Right for You?

For those seeking extra security and durability in their bound documents, wire binding can is an excellent solution. The wire design also allows booklets to lay flat when opened, which makes it a great choice for applications that encourage note-taking, such as reports or presentations. With two distinct wire binding styles available, selecting the proper method can seem confusing, especially to those who are new to binding in general. In this post, we’ll discuss the similarities and differences of twin loop wire and Spiral-O wire.

Wire Binding Spines
Spiral-O Wire Binding Spines

Twin Loop Wire: The Basics

Twin loop wire, also called “duo-wire” or “wire-o,” is a versatile binding spine that pairs security and durability with style and affordability. It has signature hole patterns of two holes per inch (21 holes per letter-sized sheet) or three holes per inch (32 holes per letter-sized sheet), depending on the thickness of the document that is being bound. Documents between 3/16″ and 9/16″ thick (5-120 sheets of standard 20 lb bond paper) utilize the 3:1 pitch pattern (three holes per inch), and documents between 5/8″ and 1-1/4″ thick (110-250 sheets of standard 20 lb bond paper) utilize the 2:1 pitch pattern (two holes per inch).

In order to create the secure, tamper-proof finish that wire binding is known for, a specialized device called a wire closer is used to pinch the open ends of the wire together and complete the bind. The majority of wire binding machines include a built-in wire closer, however they are also available as separate units. Since duo-wire comes in two different pitches, each machine is specifically set up to punch either 2:1 or 3:1 pitch hole patterns. If you are unsure as to what size documents you will be binding or want the ability to punch both 2:1 and 3:1 pitch hole patterns, you may want to consider a combination or modular machine that includes both punches.

Twin loop wire is available in sizes ranging from 3/16″ (5-20 sheets of standard 20 lb bond paper) to 1-1/4″ (240-260 sheets of 20 lb bond paper), and in 11 standard colors. Because of its popularity, duo-wire is sold in pre-cut lengths as well as bulk spools, which makes it the most economical wire binding spine.

Spiral-O: The Basics

Spiral-O wires look similar to twin loop wires, but they are specially designed to fit the same 19-hole punch pattern as comb binding. Spiral-O wires have 19 loops (similar to binding combs).

Like duo-wire, Spiral-O wire offers tamper-proof binding that is durable and lays flat when opened. The biggest advantage of binding with Spiral-O wire is that it uses the same pattern as comb binding, which means that users who already own comb binding punches do not need to purchase an additional punch, however it does require the use of a wire closer to secure the bind.

Spiral-O wire is available in sizes ranging from 1/4″ (20-30 sheets of standard 20 lb bond paper) to 1″ (190-220 sheets of 20 lb bond paper), and in seven standard colors. The per-wire cost for Spiral-O is significantly higher than that of twin loop wire, so if you plan on binding frequently, you may want to consider twin loop binding instead.

In Review

For those who already own a comb binding machine and are looking to add wire binding as an option, Spiral-O wire is a great solution. Using the punch that you already use for comb binding in conjunction with a wire closer, you can create secure wire binds without having to purchase a separate wire binding machine.

If you are new to the world of binding and are most interested in performing wire binding, then twin loop wire is your best choice. Most wire binding machines include both a punch and a wire closer, so you can purchase a single machine that will enable you bind from start to finish. Just be sure to purchase the right punch pattern for the size of documents you plan on binding (or order a combination binding machine or modular binding machine that includes both 2:1 and 3:1 pitch punching).

The Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About Carrier Sheets

Every order of thermal laminating pouches from Lamination Depot includes at least one complimentary carrier sheet. When used properly, carrier sheets can greatly improve overall laminating quality and reduce the need for roller cleaning. Many of our customers are not familiar with carrier sheets or how to correctly use them and as a result, we receive more questions about them than any other accessory we sell. To help take the mystery out of using carrier sheets, we have included answers to our frequently asked questions about carriers below. 

Carriers200

What is a carrier sheet?

A carrier is a heavy cardstock sheet with a silicone coating on one side. Each carrier is folded in half and opens like a book with the silicone side folded inward.

What does a carrier sheet do?

The purpose of a carrier sheet is two-fold – it protects the laminating pouch from scratches during the lamination process and prevents excess adhesive that oozes from the edge of the laminating pouch from sticking to the rollers (which leads to uneven and poor quality laminating). They also prevent pouches from wrapping around the rollers during lamination.

How do I use a carrier?

To use a carrier, simply insert the document that you are laminating into the laminating pouch and place the pouch inside of the carrier.

Do all machines require the use of a carrier?

No. Many machines on the market today have silicone rollers and do not require carrier sheets. Some machines require that carrier sheets be used only when using laminating pouches over a certain thickness. It is recommended that a carrier sheet be used with any pouch laminator that is equipped with non-silicone rollers, however you may want to refer to the owner’s manual for your machine for specific instructions.

Do I have to change any machine settings to use a carrier sheet?

Because the carrier sheets dissipate heat, you may have to increase the temperature in order to achieve a seal when using a carrier. You may want to perform a test run when using a carrier for the first time to ensure that your settings are correct before laminating anything important.

Why is there so much glue being left inside my carrier after lamination?

If you are noticing a large amount of adhesive left behind inside the carrier after laminating items, then that is most likely a sign that you are laminating at too high of a temperature. You will only notice trace amounts of glue inside the carrier if you are laminating at the proper temperature.

I am laminating using the thickest pouch my machine will allow. Will the carrier still fit?

Yes. Your machine should feed the thickest pouch placed within a carrier without any problem, however you may need to adjust your temperature settings in order to attain a proper seal.

Can I order extra carrier sheets?

Absolutely! Lamination Depot offers additional carrier sheets in eleven popular sizes for a nominal fee.

I’ve gotten adhesive on my rollers. Is there a way to clean them?

Yes. Lamination Depot offers a Roller Cleaning Kit that contains special cleaner and abrasive pads that will remove adhesive build-up without hardening or damaging your rollers.

Getting to Know Screw Posts: A Binding Solution with a Twist

Screw posts, also known as Chicago screws or binding posts, are extremely versatile binding devices that allow loose documents of practically any shape or size to be securely bound together. These low-cost, reusable screws enable the user to easily change out bound documents, making them a great choice for price books, menus, swatch guides, and much more.

Halfinch_200

The Basics

 A screw post is made up of two separate pieces – a threaded post attached to a head and a cylinder attached to a matching head. To create a bound item, a hole is first punched through the documents to be bound. The cylinder is inserted into the hole, and then the threaded post is inserted into the cylinder and tightened. Because the heads are of a larger diameter than the hole, the documents remain securely bound between them. To make changes within the bound document, simply unscrew the threaded post from the cylinder, insert your revised documents, and reassemble the screw post.

Another popular usage for screw posts is in conjunction with specially-designed portfolios or binders. These portfolios combine the protection and durability of a hard-bound book with the ease of updates provided by screw posts. Generally, screw post binders have hinged covers and pre-drilled holes to accommodate the posts. The user inserts their documents into special sheet protectors that have a hole pattern that matches the cover, and then threads the post through the cover and sheet protectors, tightening it to secure the documents. Since the portfolio is expandable, the user is free to add or remove sheets based on their needs.

Screw posts are sold based upon post length, and they are available in lengths ranging from 1/8″ to 4″. Screw post extensions, which allow users to add length to a post in order to securely bind additional documents, are available in lengths ranging from 1/4″ x 3/4″. All screw posts sold by Lamination Depot are made of aluminum, and have the following specifications:

Outside Post Diameter: 3/16″

Screw Head Diameter: 7/16″

Screw Head Height: 1/16″ (top and bottom heads will add a combined 1/8″ to post length)

Screw Posts 3/8″ & Smaller: Post is threaded all the way through

Screw Posts 1/2″ & Larger: Post is threaded on one side

Recommended Hole Size: 1/4″-5/16″

Uses

Unlike most binding styles, screw posts require no special equipment (with the exception of a hole punch) and can easily accommodate frequent updates. As a result, they are commonly-used for menus, wine lists, swatch books, portfolios, architectural drawings, price lists, and any other application that requires regular updates. Their low price point also makes them a great option for anyone looking to bind on a budget without having to invest in specialized machinery, such as crafters or hobbyists, schools, small offices, or even restaurants.

In Review

Keeping documents attractively and securely organized can be a challenge, whether you’re working with a lengthy manuscript or a handful of paper swatches. Screw posts provide a versatile and easy-to-use alternative to other binding methods at an exceptionally low price point. Their two-piece construction allows for no-fuss updates, making them an ideal choice for many applications. They are also easy to expand, with a number of extension lengths readily available. If you’re in need of a quick and inexpensive way to organize your documents, you’ll definitely want to give screw posts a try.

In Need of Custom Laminating Pouches?

Laminating is a versatile and inexpensive way to protect and preserve documents of almost any type. With over 300 pre-cut laminating pouch sizes in stock, Lamination Depot has a size to fit practically any laminating need. But what about those specialty projects that aren’t compatible with standard pouch sizes? That’s where our custom pouch manufacturing option can help!

Simply tell us what size, finish and thickness you need, and we’ll manufacture custom pouches to your exact specifications in six to eight weeks. Best of all, the minimum order amount is only $250, making custom laminating pouches an affordable option for nearly every budget.

Getting started on your custom pouch order is easy! Visit our custom laminating pouch page, fill in the specifics for your custom pouches and your contact information, and one of our friendly customer service representatives will contact you with a quote within three business days.

Lamination Depot also carries a full range of trimmerspunches and corner rounders to help you achieve the look of custom pouches for small quantities of non-standard documents using our in-stock laminating pouches.

An Overview of Coil Binding – One of the Most Popular Binding Styles

With all of the binding styles available in today’s marketplace, it can sometimes be a challenge to determine which one is right for your needs. From purchasing the appropriate machine to determining what supplies you will need for any given project, it is important to be able to identify the benefits and limitations of each binding style. In this post, we will cover the basics of coil binding, which is currently among the most popular binding types.

The Basics

Also referred to as spiral binding, coil binding utilizes plastic coils in order to create custom booklets. The punch pattern for coil binding is 4:1 pitch (four holes per inch), and can be created using either a manual or electric punch. After the pages have been punched with the appropriate hole pattern, a coil is fed through the holes by hand or with an electric coil inserter. A specialized set of coil crimping pliers is used to cut and crimp the ends of the coil, which secures it in place and stops it from unwinding.

Plastic Binding Coils

Plastic binding coils are available in a broad range of sizes, accommodating as few as 30 pages and as many as 460 pages. They come in standard 12″ lengths, which are made up of 48 loops and are sized to bind 8 1/2″ x 11″ (letter size) paper. Some sizes are also offered in 36″ lengths, which can be used for binding even larger documents. Coil sizing is based upon the diameter of the coil in millimeters. Binding coils offer the greatest color variety of any binding style, which makes them a great choice for individuals or organizations that are looking to create custom documents featuring team or company colors. The coil design also allows booklets to lay flat when opened, and for the cover to be folded back so that only a single page is visible. Plastic coils are very durable, and are the only mechanical binding spine that can be inserted by hand.

For information on which size coil to use for your project, refer to this coil binding chart. To see the selection of coil sizes and colors offered by Lamination Depot, visit our coil binding supplies section.

Coil Binding Machines

Coil binding is based on two individual processes – punching the documents that are to be bound and insertingthe binding coil into the punched documents. Both of these processes can be accomplished using either manual or electric means, however manual inserting is only recommended for low-volume binding (or for binding with coils over 22mm). Many coil binding machines perform both processes, but it is important to read the description thoroughly because some machines only punch while others only insert coils into punched documents.

When researching machines that perform punching (either with or without an inserter), there are a number of factors to consider. The primary difference between available models is whether they are manual or electric, which has a major impact on the speed at which the operator is able to complete a job (with electric punches being much faster). Some punches only punch letter-sized paper, while others can accommodate larger sizes. The punch capacity (the number of sheets that can be punched at one time) ranges from 10-55 sheets, and some machines offer the ability to selectively disengage some or all of the punching pins (which allows the user to punch non-standard paper sizes or specialty paper, such as three-hole paper). Many machines include an adjustable depth margin, enabling the operator to move the placement of the holes relative to the edge of the paper. A number of professional-level machines punch oval holes instead of circular holes, which makes for easier coil insertion and more fluid page turning for readers. Select machines include other punching patterns in addition to the 4:1 pitch coil pattern, making them a cost-effective option for organizations interested in performing multiple binding styles (such as comb and wire).

Electric inserters utilize small rollers that spin and advance the binding coil through the holes of the punched document. Depending on the model, the roller ranges from 4 to 11″ in length and is generally operated by a foot pedal. Select models also include an electric coil cutter and crimper to streamline the production process, while others include a pair of manual cutting and crimping pliers. Basic, low-volume machines do not always include pliers, so they will need to be purchased separately as they are required for completing a coil bind.

To learn more about any of the coil binding machines available at Lamination Depot, visit our coil binding equipment section.

In Review

Coil binding is a popular, easy-to-use mechanical binding method that results in booklets that lay flat and can be folded backwards. The plastic coils used to bind the pages together are durable, inexpensive and available in the largest selection of colors of any binding spine style. With both manual and electric punching and inserting options available, it is possible to achieve a professional-looking, bound document within practically any budget. It is the only mechanical binding style that can be preformed manually, but because manual inserting is time consuming, it is recommended only for low-volume users. Electric punching and inserting can greatly increase binding speed and reduce operator fatigue, so it is recommended for high-volume production environments.

Earth-Friendly Binding & Laminating Supplies

Earth-conscious products are in higher demand than ever, and Lamination Depot is here to help fill your binding and laminating needs with ecologically-friendly products. Read on to learn about our selection of environmentally-sound binding supplies, including binding posts, paper covers and a brand new binding system, as well as an innovative roll laminator designed to reduce energy consumption.

Screw Posts

We carry more than 20 sizes of screw posts (also called “Chicago Screws”) and screw posts extensions, all of which are made of solid aluminum and are 100% recyclable. These reusable binding posts are a great choice for swatch books, architectural and engineering drawings, or any other application that requires loose sheets to be securely bound together. Click here to see our entire selection of recyclable aluminum screw posts.

PaperLock Binding System

This revolutionary PaperLock binding system is attractive, eco-friendly and secure. Using paper punched on a traditional plastic comb binding system, thisbinding system inserts a patented PaperCombthat securely binds documents and allows them to be easily stacked and stored. The materials used to produce the PaperCombs are environmentally-friendly and can be recycled, making the PaperLock binding system a functional and “green” addition to any office. Click here to learn more about the PaperLock binding system.

Binding Covers

With eight vibrant colors and three rich textures to choose from, our Earth-friendly binding covers are manufactured using recycled materials and are 100% recyclable! Heavy-weight Grain covers feature a sturdy 16 mil. thickness, are available in eight colors, and are made from 25% recycled materials and 10% post consumer waste. Linen Weave covers feature 80# (12 mil.) linen-textured cover stock in five eye-catching colors, and are made from 20% recycled material and 30% post consumer waste. Leatherette covers feature 80# (12 mil.) leather-textured embossed paper, and are made from 20% recycled material and 30% post consumer waste. These attractive and environmentally-conscious covers are offered in a variety of sizes with both round and square corners available.